On Google AMP


On Google AMP

I've had trouble with reconciling how I think about AMP.

When Google first came out with AMP I bought the story.

I read the docs and found myself nodding along.

By applying a forced constraint to the market, through an open source framework, the web, as a result, would become more efficient at content delivery.

Publishers would adopt the technology and we'd experience faster load times overall and have a more enjoyable experience.

Sounds great right?

Well yes, it sounded fantastic until you started looking at the numbers after people began implementing it.


On my sites, my client's sites and through public case studies I've seen nothing but negative impact on metrics that matter.

Revenue, rankings, and engagement. 

Sure, some other metrics have improved as we have seen in some publicly posted articles and studies but the ones that actually move the needle for my business and others is falling flat.

So all this to say that I'm now going on the record to default to the answer "no" when asked, "should I add AMP functionality to my site?". 

Before my answer may have been "try it out and see" but not anymore. 

Most people don't actually understand the problem they are solving with AMP. 

Sure, pages load faster, but so do all well-optimized sites. 

Fix the core problem and don't add a patch. 

If you're interested in diving into this discussion and going down your own rabbit hole to come up with your own opinion on it, start here: 

Quite a few high-profile web developers have this year weighted in with criticism and some, following a Google conference dedicated to AMP, have cautioned users about diving in with both feet.

These, in my view, don’t go far enough in stating the problem and I feel this needs to be said very clearly: Google’s AMP is bad — bad in a potentially web-destroying way. Google AMP is bad news for how the web is built, it’s bad news for publishers of credible online content, and it’s bad news for consumers of that content. Google AMP is only good for one party: Google. Google, and possibly, purveyors of fake news.
The above snippet is from Scott Gilbertson, writing for The Register, in an article titled: KILL GOOGLE AMP BEFORE IT KILLS THE WEB.

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